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How To Ace Your Science Exams!

Studying for any science-related exam or test needs a structured plan. First of all, you need to know which topics are likely to be included in the exam so that you can study them thoroughly. Exams never include the whole course syllabus and you can usually get an idea of what’s going to be covered by going through old exam papers from recent years.

Organise all the relevant textbooks, notes, handouts and web information you have gathered during your course so that you can create your own tailor made study guide. Now get yourself a highlighter pen, a note pad and some sticky Post-it notes and you’re ready to start.

Follow the following simple steps and sail through your exams!

1. Once you’ve gathered together all the text book chapters and lecture notes on the relevant areas of your course, read through everything at least twice.

Now take a highlighter pen and mark all the most important topics, key words, definitions and sub-topics. Look over all the highlighted words and make sure you have understood everything you’ve read. If there are any areas you are unsure of, mark the page with a Post-it note so that you can go over those points again until you are absolutely confident that you understand everything. Take your time; science notes are notoriously complex and detailed and it’s easy to skim-read pages without actually taking in what you’ve read.

2. Now take your note pad and write out each of the highlighted pieces of information to create your own personalised study guide. Compare your classroom notes and any other notations you’ve made during lab bench sessions with the highlighted information. Remember to use information that your lecturer presented during classes as well as what you’ve extracted from course books. All science subject course books use graphs and illustrations for many of their topics. Copy these out into your notebook and add them to your study guide. Anything you can’t easily copy can be photocopied or printed out if your resource is online.

3. Take all the information you have accumulated during the above processes and collate it carefully into sections. Use dividers to clearly demark the different topics and file everything neatly in a ring-binder folder. Put together a detailed index including sub-topics and file this at the front of your study guide for ease of reference.

4. Now you can begin to use your guide. The process of creating the study guide should have given you a good head start to your revision and re-reading it will serve to reinforce your knowledge, giving you confidence at your depth of knowledge of your subject as you read. An effective technique is to read your notes aloud as you go. This helps to clarify the information and will help you to identify areas on which you are weak or still unsure. Write down anything you don’t feel confident on and use this as a guide to areas which need further study.

Putting together your own study guide will help you to ‘see the wood for the trees’ during the revision process and being organised and methodical makes the process much quicker, less intimidating and far more effective.

Alison Page

About Alison Page

Alison is a small business owner, freelance writer, author and dressage judge. She has degrees in Equine Science and Business Studies. Read her full story at http://www.theladywriter.co.uk

Alison Page

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How To Ace Your Science Exams!

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